Sunday , September 25 2022

Black Friday is coming soon. Here’s how to snag the best deals now

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Don’t delay stocking as these deals won’t stick around for long.

Dashia Starr

Writer

Dashia writes for CNET. In the past, she wrote for several industries, including FinTech, home security, automation, and more. She loves baking bundt cakes and her favorite flavor is white chocolate raspberry.

CNET editors independently choose every product and service we cover. Though we can’t review every available financial company or offer, we strive to make comprehensive, rigorous comparisons in order to highlight the best of them. When you apply for products or services through our links, we may earn a commission. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact how ads and links appear on our site.

We are an independent publisher. Our advertisers do not direct our editorial content. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, or recommendations expressed in editorial content are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by the advertiser.

To support our work, we are paid in different ways for providing advertising services. For example, some advertisers pay us to display ads, others pay us when you click on certain links, and others pay us when you submit your information to request a quote or other offer details. CNET’s compensation is never tied to whether you purchase an insurance product. We don’t charge you for our services. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact what ads and links appear on our site, and how, where, and in what order ads and links appear.

Our insurance content may include references to or advertisements by our corporate affiliate HomeInsurance.com LLC, a licensed insurance producer (NPN: 8781838). And HomeInsurance.com LLC may receive compensation from third parties if you choose to visit and transact on their website. However, all CNET editorial content is independently researched and developed without regard to our corporate relationship to HomeInsurance.com LLC or its advertiser relationships.

Our content may include summaries of insurance providers, or their products or services. CNET is not an insurance agency or broker. We do not transact in the business of insurance in any manner, and we are not attempting to sell insurance or asking or urging you to apply for a particular kind of insurance from a particular company.

In a digital world, information only matters if it’s timely, relevant, and credible. We promise to do whatever is necessary to get you the information you need when you need it, to make our opinions fair and useful, and to make sure our facts are accurate.

If a popular product is on store shelves, you can count on CNET for immediate commentary and benchmark analysis as soon as possible. We promise to publish credible information we have as soon as we have it, throughout a product’s life cycle, from its first public announcement to any potential recall or emergence of a competing device.

How will we know if we’re fulfilling our mission? We constantly monitor our competition, user activity, and journalistic awards. We scour and scrutinize blogs, sites, aggregators, RSS feeds, and any other available resources, and editors at all levels of our organization continuously review our coverage.

But you’re the final judge. We ask that you inform us whenever you find an error, spot a gap in our coverage, or have any other suggestions for improvement. Readers are part of the CNET family, and the strength of that relationship is the ultimate test of our success. Find out more here.

Normally, Black Friday — the day after Thanksgiving — jump-starts the holiday gift-buying season. (Here are the latest ad scans for several retailers.) But holiday shipping delays and the ongoing silicon chip shortage that’s related to the COVID-19 pandemic mean you’re better off getting your holiday shopping started as soon as possible this year. It’d be a shame if your gifts didn’t arrive until after your winter holiday was over.

With the chip shortage and shipping delays, highly sought-after gifts — like the PlayStation 5 — are expected to be even harder to find this year.

We’re also hearing that deals may not be as spectacular as in years past, so we don’t anticipate you’ll lose many opportunities by buying now rather than waiting. And again, a gift in the hand is worth two stuck in the mail. (Isn’t that how that saying goes?)

We’ll tell you how to save on all the products you want ahead of Black Friday. We’ll also show you how to get discounts on some of the latest Apple products and other gear with trade-ins and other offers. For deals happening now, we’ve rounded up the best at Walmart, Best Buy, Target and Amazon.

You’ll find CNET’s best holiday shopping and deals pages here:

Retailers have already started their sales weeks ahead of Black Friday. Target’s deals kick off on Nov. 21, with discounts on kitchen appliances, smart home products and electronics. Amazon already has a ton of early Black Friday deals listed on its Home page, from streaming sticks to games. 

Walmart has a slew of products on sale right now, with more savings coming Nov. 22. And Best Buy has kicked off its early Black Friday sale, too.

But beware that some sales may be repetitive. You’ll see the same price drops again and again, with a lot of products dropping back to previous lows they were selling at days or weeks before. And watch out for “fake sales” that try to convince you into thinking you’re getting a discount when instead you’re being given the retail price. If you come across a fake promotion this holiday season, it’s best to alert the Federal Trade Commission

Price-match guarantees are the best way to assure you that you’re getting a good deal. For example, Best Buy is guaranteeing Black Friday prices on TVs, headphones and other products. But there’s a catch. The guarantee is only for Best Buy Totaltech or My Best Buy members. Subscribers that buy an item marked Black Friday Prices Guaranteed will automatically receive a refund or the difference if the price drops. But members must be signed in when making the purchase to get Best Buy’s Black Friday Guarantee. 

Other major retailers, like Target and Walmart, have price-match guarantees year-round to adjust the price if you find a better deal elsewhere. But keep in mind that the price match may only be for select stores and may not work for online retailers.

Some gaming consoles and phones will be harder to get this year due to the chip shortage that experts forecast may not improve until 2023. The supply chain’s bottlenecks mean that fewer gaming consoles, phones and other electronics will be available as the holiday season gets closer. 

Many retailers that get shipments of these products are giving first dibs to their subscribers, like customers who subscribe to Amazon Prime. Customers who sign up will be given the first choice of hard-to-get electronics, like the PS5 or the Xbox Series X. But if you’re not pressed to get the latest and greatest, you may have better luck finding a step-down model, like the Xbox Series S or the non-OLED Nintendo Switch, for cheaper. 

Walmart Plus and GameStop PowerUp Rewards Pro are two membership subscription services that are taking advantage of the product releases, discounts and free shipping for their subscribers. Keep in mind that some memberships, like Walmart and Amazon, require a paid membership for the perks.

If you’re looking for a good deal on the latest iPhone 13, iPad or Apple Watch Series 7, trading in your old one may save you money. Right now, Verizon is offering $200 off the latest Apple Watch when you trade in an older model that’s in good, working condition. That means you may be able to get the newest model for half of the starting retail price. 

But there’s a catch — you’ll likely have to commit to a two-year contract. You may also be able to get one at retail stores but the deal may not be as good. 

One other savings hack is to check membership warehouse clubs for deals on Apple and Samsung devices. Sometimes you may luck out with extra accessories and services when you purchase a new iPad ahead of the holidays. 

There are other savings that you can shop for when the Black Friday sales end. Best Buy has a Deal of the Day year-round to give you a special offer for one day only. Amazon Prime members can also check Lightning Deals (redubbed “Epic Deals” for the holidays) to get limited-time offers on items and free one- or two-day shipping for Prime members.

The editorial content on this page is based solely on objective, independent assessments by our writers and is not influenced by advertising or partnerships. It has not been provided or commissioned by any third party. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products or services offered by our partners.

This Article was first published on cnet.com

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