Monday , October 18 2021
airport security

How to get TSA PreCheck, Global Entry and Clear for free

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Ready for that long-overdue vacation? You don’t need to pay to skip the security line at the airport.

CNET editors independently choose every product and service we cover. Though we can’t review every available financial company or offer, we strive to make comprehensive, rigorous comparisons in order to highlight the best of them. When you apply for products or services through our links, we may earn a commission. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact how ads and links appear on our site.

We are an independent publisher. Our advertisers do not direct our editorial content. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, or recommendations expressed in editorial content are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by the advertiser.

To support our work, we are paid in different ways for providing advertising services. For example, some advertisers pay us to display ads, others pay us when you click on certain links, and others pay us when you submit your information to request a quote or other offer details. CNET’s compensation is never tied to whether you purchase an insurance product. We don’t charge you for our services. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact what ads and links appear on our site, and how, where, and in what order ads and links appear.

Our insurance content may include references to or advertisements by our corporate affiliate HomeInsurance.com LLC, a licensed insurance producer (NPN: 8781838). And HomeInsurance.com LLC may receive compensation from third parties if you choose to visit and transact on their website. However, all CNET editorial content is independently researched and developed without regard to our corporate relationship to HomeInsurance.com LLC or its advertiser relationships.

Our content may include summaries of insurance providers, or their products or services. CNET is not an insurance agency or broker. We do not transact in the business of insurance in any manner, and we are not attempting to sell insurance or asking or urging you to apply for a particular kind of insurance from a particular company.

In a digital world, information only matters if it’s timely, relevant, and credible. We promise to do whatever is necessary to get you the information you need when you need it, to make our opinions fair and useful, and to make sure our facts are accurate.

If a popular product is on store shelves, you can count on CNET for immediate commentary and benchmark analysis as soon as possible. We promise to publish credible information we have as soon as we have it, throughout a product’s life cycle, from its first public announcement to any potential recall or emergence of a competing device.

How will we know if we’re fulfilling our mission? We constantly monitor our competition, user activity, and journalistic awards. We scour and scrutinize blogs, sites, aggregators, RSS feeds, and any other available resources, and editors at all levels of our organization continuously review our coverage.

But you’re the final judge. We ask that you inform us whenever you find an error, spot a gap in our coverage, or have any other suggestions for improvement. Readers are part of the CNET family, and the strength of that relationship is the ultimate test of our success. Find out more here.

After a year where your biggest trip out was probably to the curb of the grocery store and back, are you ready to start traveling again? With more than 140 million Americans fully vaccinated and travel restrictions being lifted, people are again taking to the skies. If you are ready to resume air travel, don’t start your post-pandemic vacation by standing in a long security line at the airport. You’ve waited too long to stress about making your flight.

TSA PreCheck, Global Entry and Clear are programs that allow you to breeze through airport security. But before you plunk down money on these program fees — and after you digested the security and privacy concerns of enrolling such a program — you may want to look at the many credit cards that cover the costs. Similarly, you can redeem loyalty points or frequent-flyer miles to get a free TSA PreCheck, Global Entry or Clear membership.

To save you from digging through the details of your next credit card statement or rewards program FAQ page, I’ve assembled in one convenient spot the credit cards and loyalty programs that cover all or some of the cost of TSA PreCheck, Global Entry or Clear. Check out the lists and links below.

Related: Best travel credit cards for 2021

TSA PreCheck and Global Entry are run by the US government, while a private company operates Clear. 

Read: TSA PreCheck vs. Global Entry vs. Clear compared

TSA PreCheck costs $85 for five years. Global Entry costs $100 for five years. Clear is considerably more expensive at $179 per year. The ideal combination is Global Entry and Clear, letting you breeze through the security line, then going through screening without reorganizing your entire wardrobe. But that’s expensive, so, read on.

In most cases, if a credit card features a TSA PreCheck or Global Entry benefit, it gives you the choice of a $100 credit to cover the cost of Global Entry or an $85 credit to cover the cost of TSA PreCheck. I don’t know why you would opt for the latter if both are free. Remember, Global Entry includes all of the benefits of TSA PreCheck and adds a speedier way through US customs and immigration. Some cards, however, offer only an $85 credit, which would leave you with a $15 balance to cover the cost of Global Entry.

The following credit cards include up to a $100 credit at least every five years to cover a five-year membership to TSA PreCheck or Global Entry:

In addition to credit cards, there are a handful of traveler loyalty programs that let you trade points or miles for a free membership to TSA PreCheck.

There are fewer ways to get a free or discounted Clear membership, but they do exist. Delta and United frequent flyers as well as Hertz members can get a deal on Clear.

For Delta flyers, Clear is free for Diamond Medallion members, $109 a year for Platinum, Gold and Silver Medallion members, and $119 a year for General SkyMiles members. 

On United, Clear free for Premier 1K members, $109 a year for United credit cardmembers in the US and Platinum, Gold and Silver Premier members. And it’s $119 a year for MileagePlus members.

Hertz Gold Plus Rewards members can get Clear for a discounted rate of $129 a year — a savings of $50.

Disclaimer: The information included in this article, including program features, program fees, and credits available through credit cards to apply to such programs, may change from time-to-time and are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please check the credit card provider’s website and review its terms and conditions for the most current offers and information. 

The editorial content on this page is based solely on objective, independent assessments by our writers and is not influenced by advertising or partnerships. It has not been provided or commissioned by any third party. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products or services offered by our partners.

This Article was first published on cnet.com

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