Sunday , October 24 2021

Save an extra 5% at over 150 stores with the Slide cash-back app

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It’s like free money. This new twist on the old cash-back model can yield added savings on many purchases.

CNET editors independently choose every product and service we cover. Though we can’t review every available financial company or offer, we strive to make comprehensive, rigorous comparisons in order to highlight the best of them. When you apply for products or services through our links, we may earn a commission. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact how ads and links appear on our site.

We are an independent publisher. Our advertisers do not direct our editorial content. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, or recommendations expressed in editorial content are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by the advertiser.

To support our work, we are paid in different ways for providing advertising services. For example, some advertisers pay us to display ads, others pay us when you click on certain links, and others pay us when you submit your information to request a quote or other offer details. CNET’s compensation is never tied to whether you purchase an insurance product. We don’t charge you for our services. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact what ads and links appear on our site, and how, where, and in what order ads and links appear.

Our insurance content may include references to or advertisements by our corporate affiliate HomeInsurance.com LLC, a licensed insurance producer (NPN: 8781838). And HomeInsurance.com LLC may receive compensation from third parties if you choose to visit and transact on their website. However, all CNET editorial content is independently researched and developed without regard to our corporate relationship to HomeInsurance.com LLC or its advertiser relationships.

Our content may include summaries of insurance providers, or their products or services. CNET is not an insurance agency or broker. We do not transact in the business of insurance in any manner, and we are not attempting to sell insurance or asking or urging you to apply for a particular kind of insurance from a particular company.

In a digital world, information only matters if it’s timely, relevant, and credible. We promise to do whatever is necessary to get you the information you need when you need it, to make our opinions fair and useful, and to make sure our facts are accurate.

If a popular product is on store shelves, you can count on CNET for immediate commentary and benchmark analysis as soon as possible. We promise to publish credible information we have as soon as we have it, throughout a product’s life cycle, from its first public announcement to any potential recall or emergence of a competing device.

How will we know if we’re fulfilling our mission? We constantly monitor our competition, user activity, and journalistic awards. We scour and scrutinize blogs, sites, aggregators, RSS feeds, and any other available resources, and editors at all levels of our organization continuously review our coverage.

But you’re the final judge. We ask that you inform us whenever you find an error, spot a gap in our coverage, or have any other suggestions for improvement. Readers are part of the CNET family, and the strength of that relationship is the ultimate test of our success. Find out more here.

There’s yet another way to get cash back when you shop online and in stores.

I try to use at least one cash-back tool wherever I shop. That includes not only a cash-back credit card, but also some kind of service that piles on extra savings. Recently I found a pretty great one: Slide, a relatively new cash-back service that can save you as much as 5% per transaction. It works with over 150 retail and online stores, including Apple, eBay, Instacart, Lowe’s and Petco.

To get started with Slide, you first connect a payment method — Apple Pay, PayPal, credit card or debit card — to the Slide app. When you’re ready to make a purchase, you use Slide to purchase a gift card in the amount you need. Then you pay for the item or items using the gift card.

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Doing that earns you 4% cash back. However, if you add funds prior to that process, Slide immediately gives you 1% back, effectively bumping your total savings to 5%.

So, let’s use Apple as an example. Say you’ve decided to buy an unlocked iPhone SE for $399. Here’s how you’d go about that using Slide:

This is, of course, a bit different from traditional cash-back tools like Dosh (which links directly to your credit card) and Rakuten (which tracks your purchases). For one thing, you’re getting a flat 4% back at every store, or 5% if you added funds in advance. For another, you can easily double-dip if your paired payment method offers rewards of its own.

Read more: Surprising ways to get cash back without even trying, from your credit card and more

For example, if your credit card gives you 2% back at restaurants and you use Slide for a meal at, say, Chipotle, you’re getting an extra 4% (or 5%) on top of that.

Take note, however, that if you need to return something (like the aforementioned iPhone), you can’t get a refund on the gift card itself. Be sure to read Slide’s help-desk page regarding returns and refunds. I’ve also found that although the gift card purchase process is pretty quick and painless, I usually don’t bother when making small purchases. To me it’s not worth the hassle to save 50 cents on a $10 pizza.

But I was very glad to have Slide in my pocket for a recent bigger-ticket item I bought from Lowe’s. When you’re able to save $10, $15 or the like with just a few taps, it feels pretty good.

Want to learn more about the service? We interviewed company CEO Jay Klauminzer in this episode of the Cheapskate Show podcast, embedded below.

Read moreThe best cash-back services for 2021

CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow him on Facebook and Twitter. You can also sign up for deal texts delivered right to your phone. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and and check out our CNET Coupons page for the latest Walmart discount codeseBay couponsSamsung promo codes and even more from hundreds of other online stores. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Answers live on our FAQ page.

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